Highlights

Introduced in , all National Ukes have a guitar-shaped body, If you’re looking for a gig-worthy, session-ready vintage resonator look no further. This National Duolian sounds like heaven and needs nothing. In their catalog, National list eight key In , a new, fancier single cone guitar model was introduced Lot 79 — National Frying Pan lap steel guitar, circa National Frying Pan lap steel guitar, circa , no. This is a National Triolian Steel guitar National Style 2 Tricone, ‘s Sale!

Ranked Van Morrison Albums From Worst To Best

National used, Grand Console Model Double Neck Lap Steel Tag No Used ISI , each neck has 8-strings; it does not have legs – it never had legs; not made with ’em , in very good condition, in its original brown exterior hard shell case. This model has twin rounded headstocks, each finished in black; 8 tuners protrude upwardly from each headstock. One tuner button was broken on its shaft and needed to be replaced. The tuner gears are located behind a long nickel-plated cover bearing the National logo and long art deco lines.

A selector tool to be used by suppliers and buying organisations preparing a catalogue for upload into PECOS; Updated on 10th September for use with Excel

Van Morrison has proven to be the most prolific of the mid-’60s rock stars, averaging a new effort every year and a half for forty-five years. This week sees the first new Van Morrison album, Born to Sing: No Plan B, in a record four years. So we’re talking a look back at Morrison’s hulking discography, before he makes it any bigger. Inarticulate Speech of the Heart Fresh from a flirtation with Scientology, Morrison included a “special thanks” to L.

Ron Hubbard in the liner notes for this album. Hubbard isn’t exactly known for inspiring people to make good decisions; maybe that explains why Morrison stuffed this album with instrumentals. Robbed of his two greatest assets — his voice and lyrics — Morrison has little to offer. When inspiration is missing, looseness can turn to sloppiness, loftiness can become pretentiousness, and lack of commercial appeal can be an excuse for lack of appeal, period.

Common One, a turgid attempt to recreate Astral Weeks that delivers six snooze-worthy tracks over fifty-five minutes. You Win Again You’ve got to give credit to Linda Gail Lewis, who sings with the same Southern grit as her more famous brother, Jerry Lee; it takes brass to sing alongside a voice as robust and familiar as Morrison’s for forty-two minutes.

Still, the two seemed to think rollicking old songs from Bo Diddley, John Lee Hooker, and Jerry Lee himself would work as duets between two old people.

How Sweet The Sound!

Like Randy Newman , the Mael brothers have a knack for voicing the hopes and regrets of diverse, sometimes unsympathetic characters; and the latitude afforded by their operatic arrangements allows them to add commentary in real time, like an instrumental Greek chorus. One treats high art as nonsense, the other treats nonsense as high art: These are songs about the fleeting impermanence of joy, compared to the lingering bruise of despair, and how hard it is to live in this unfairly weighted emotional space.

Or at least, nothing cheerful. This anthology of bizarre instrumentals was her final work for the label, its enthusiastic diversity and effusive character making for an apt tribute. Tribal drums, twangy guitars, spooky organs and synths abound, often in unusual combinations:

National View as Grid List Sort By Name / Title Name Price: Low to High Price: High to Low Price Date: Newest First Date Artist Alphabetical Artist Alphabetical Trending Trending.

Berkeley Red, White, and Bruised: Bloodied by combat, Japan’s disabled veterans were heroically cast as “heroes in white,” a term derived from the white hospital gowns that they habitually wore in public. But, after , these living casualties of war had to endure not only the trauma of battle and the unease of newly-acquired disabilities but also military occupation by the very-same foe that battered their bodies and shattered their lives.

In what ways did total war and total defeat shape the Japanese disabled veteran of the Second World War? Excessive Cult or Proper Ritual?: Challenges for the 21st Century William C.

Past Events

This iconic instrument was favoured by many Blues players for its loud ringing tone that could penetrate down the street or across a big room. In the days before amplification, a guitar that could penetrate across a noisy crowd was a big bonus and so, back in the day, National and Dobro resonator guitars were at the cutting edge of technology.

Resonator guitars were invented by John Dopyera, who was born into a large family in Slovakia in Arriving in LA, John set up a shop to make and repair violins and all kinds of stringed instruments. A local vaudeville promoter, George Beauchamp asked John to come up with a loud guitar to cut through the sound of the small orchestras at his shows.

National built the Duolian metal-body vintage resonator from to What makes this Duolian different from many others is its frosted Duco crinkle-type finish, in .

Rickenbacker did not keep Serial to date records until after the Second World War. I will tell you what is generally known and some distinguishing features that should help. It is impossible to tell the exact year many of the early Bakelites were built because of this lack of record keeping. However there are some features that will help you to come close.

Rickenbacker was issued a patent on the pickup effective August 10, Old Adolf Rickenbacker was so happy that on that very day, all guitars had the patent number clearly stamped on the little metal piece that holds the pick up in place.

National Vintage Steel Tricone Guitar

The following text is a humorous essay written for the layperson. It originally appeared in a companion booklet to my Christmas Collection CDs. The information, while factual, is presented in a personal, unorthodox manner. No offense is intended toward my fellow musicians or fellow musicologists.

The National name is used by National Reso-Phonic Guitars, founded in , specialised in reproductions of historic instruments of all brands, not just National pattern instruments. The Dobro name has been owned by Gibson Guitar Corporation since

Hold on, it’s a long one! Resonators use metal cone s to amplify the sound of the strings, instead of a wooden top and sound hole like normal acoustic guitars. Resonators can have non-tone wood bodies thick laminate or plywood , or Brass metal bodies. Resonators can be played like a standard guitar fretted in standard tuning , BUT are most often played with some sort of slide in open tunings.

Resonators come in two MAIN varieties: You usually use a slide BAR held in your hand. Bluegrass and country “Dobro” is often played on Square necks. Round necks you usually play like a normal guitar. You usually use a slide around one of your fingers. Round necks are good for “hybrid” playing, or playing with fretted notes as well as notes with the slide.

Dobro or National – wood or metal?

Some of these models used a “M-” prefix or “M” suffix around the model number. Hawaiian square neck models used a “P-” prefix or “H” suffix. The most common model. The second most common model, appeared in catalogs in but may have been available a year earlier , and hence should always have a pickguard or at least two holes in the body where a pickguard was mounted.

S1 E2 The Son of God Unpacking the unique Kim father-son relationship further, “Son of God” tracks the decline of Kim Il Sung and the rise of his son, Kim Jong Il.

Hardwoods are favored for the body or framing element of an instrument. Softwoods[ edit ] Spruces are often used in the sound boards of instruments from the lute , violin , oud , mandolin , guitar , and harpsichord families; as well as the piano. Spruce is particularly suited for this use because of its high stiffness-to-weight ratio.

Cedars , particularly Western Redcedar Thuja plicata, not a true cedar , have since the s been used in the tops of classical guitars and to a less degree in steel string acoustic guitars. Yew was once widely used for lute bowls. Other softwoods, such as redwood and Douglas fir have been used to a limited degree. Hardwoods[ edit ] Maple is traditionally used for the backs and sides of violin family instruments.

It is also frequently seen in acoustic guitars and mandolins.

Steel Guitar Rag (on a 1932 National Style O)


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